Tag Archives: #familyhistory

Walter Tennyas Griffin – Plows and Pennies

Shortly after his birth in 1898, WT Griffin, named after his father and the poet Tennyson, moved from Newton, Utah to Indian Valley, Idaho to homestead. Life was hard living off the land, raising grain and livestock. At age five … Continue reading

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Abraham and Elizabeth Coon – Ever Faithful

#In about 1841, with their new Mormon faith and seven children under the age of eleven, my 3rd great grandparents, Abraham and Elizabeth Coon experienced the heavy persecutions that drove the Latter-day Saints from Missouri. More children came in Nauvoo … Continue reading

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John Griffin – Frontiersman

In 1876, on a trip to Florence Nebraska to bring goods back to Salt Lake City, my great-great-grandfather John Griffin and east-bound company attempted to get west-bound pioneers, goods, and oxen across the Green River in Wyoming. Due to storm … Continue reading

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Andrew Fredrick Losee – Teacher and Farmer

In the early 1920s, having served as a wireless telegraph operator and sergeant at the end of World War 1, high school valedictorian Andrew Fredrick Losee, set his course for college degrees that would some day land him as a … Continue reading

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Harvey Ralph Hansen – Perseverance

In the 1940s, during the boom-town years in Los Angeles, Harvey Ralph Hansen became a highly successful grocery businessman, first with Safeway, then on his own, feeding the ever-growing population of World War II factory workers flooding in from the … Continue reading

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Ella Mae Walker – The Little Things

During World War 1, and the Influenza Epidemic of 1918, sixteen-year-old Ella Mae Walker lay sick in bed for a week. “People died like ants,” she said. Everyone wore masks. “No one seemed to be exempt from the terrible disease.” … Continue reading

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Charlotte Hannah Dearden – Hard Work, Love, and Smile

In 1924, eleven months after returning to Utah from difficult homesteading in Canada, my great-grandmother Charlotte Hannah Dearden Hardman was widowed with eight children when her hard working husband died of a broken ulcer. They had previously lost and buried … Continue reading

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Cheryl Hardman Atwood – Overcoming

In 1969, when mankind overcame great odds and touched the moon, the late Cheryl Hardman Atwood received respite from her desperate struggle with a debilitating fatal disease; then finished college, married, became a teacher, and raised a great family, touching … Continue reading

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Jacob Hardman – Horses and Homesteads

Don’t ever tell Jacob Hardman that he couldn’t ride a horse. He was once bet $25.00 that he couldn’t ride a tortured big black mean one, but he did. He bred and broke horses, ran cattle, herded sheep, and hauled … Continue reading

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John Hardman – To the Captains Aid; Blessings Deferred

During the industrial revolution, John Hardman, my 3rd great uncle was a young working class mechanic in Manchester, England. Shortly after his father’s death, when apostles came, he recognized the truth, and joined the Latter-day Saints. But false notions and … Continue reading

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