George Clark and Elizabeth Phoebe Rye Morris

Screen Shot 2016-08-20 at 2.18.36 PMPhoebe wiped tears from her face as her creek-soaked children happily burst into their small summer home. “Why are you crying,” they asked. Phoebe quickly got them pulling molasses candy as she pushed back on her memories. She was happy with her husband, her children, and her faith, but change was hard. They had joined the Latter-day Saints in England. Back home, Elders had come regularly for cottage meetings, singing songs of Zion. George and Phoebe had a roast feast on the Sabbath, then they would walk up the rolling green pasture amongst the large oaks. As shoe makers he fixed soles and did tacking while she sewed them. He would then walk 10 miles, deliver their work, receive pay, and bring back work for next week. They ate bread and butter, simple black English tea and sometimes bread pudding with sugar and a raisin. Some family members had already immigrated and George had been anxious to take his wife and children. In 1883, they sent little Clara and Lillie to Salt Lake to live with family. A year later, George made the trip. He worked on a farm to earn travel for the rest. A year later, Phoebe set sail with the other 4 and eventually they enjoyed a happy reunion living in Bingham Junction. Phoebe wiped another tear as she looked at her stove. “I miss my cooking fireplace,” she thought. Until beds could be filled with straw or corn shucks, they were simple quilts on the floor. Money was tight for school, so the children often worked away from home, but at least they were together on Sunday afternoons. George worked on the railroad from Midvale to Bingham coming home each day with a sunburned nose in the summer, or an icy mustache in the winter. Having sacrificed some of their English connections for the gospel, George and Phoebe knew that their separations were only temporary. Again with sacrifice, they made a week-long journey to the Logan Temple where their family was united for always.

By Kenneth Richard Hardman, based on material in, Hardman Biographies – Ancestors of Sidney Glenn Hardman and Dorothy Mae Griffin. #AncestorClips

Inherited Traits – Like great-great-grandma and grandpa Clark, I have always been anxious to be with family, and to be united with people of my faith. At the same time, changes have never been easy and I miss my family members when we are separated.

Patterns of Goodness – I can learn from their pattern of hard work as cobblers, farmers, railroad workers, and in raising a large family. They demonstrated patience to get their whole family to Utah, a few at a time. I can apply their patience to the hopes I have for the long term spiritual destinations of my family. Thanks grandma and grandpa Clark for my life, and for your example.

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3 Responses to George Clark and Elizabeth Phoebe Rye Morris

  1. JHuntington says:

    That was wonderful! What a great way to share family history! Thank you.

  2. Pingback: 2016 – 10 Most Read AncestorClips | #AncestorClips

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